June News: AIA Awards and Press

AIA Northern Virginia Design Awards

In June 2016 the Northern Virginia AIA Chapter honored Cunningham | Quill Architects with four new AIA design awards in the categories of Commercial Architecture, Historic Architecture and Institutional Architecture. We are thrilled to now have 67 AIA awards!

The Hyde – Award of Merit in Commercial Architecture

House of Lebanon – Award of Merit in Commercial Architecture

Tucker Hall – Award of Merit in Historic Architecture

Dumbarton Oaks Fellowship House – Award of Merit in Institutional Architecture

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Top row, from left to right: Garden Room at the Dumbarton Oaks Fellowship House, Exterior Elevation of the The Hyde. Bottom row, from left to right: Community Courtyard at the House of Lebanon, Cupola Reading Nook at the Tucker Hall

 

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Cunningham | Quill Team Accepting one of the Design Awards

 

Affordable Housing Conference of Montgomery County, Maryland
2016 Affordable Housing Architectural Design Awards

The Affordable Housing Conference of Montgomery County advocates that “decent, safe and affordable housing for all Americans is an inalienable right and not a privilege.” Cunningham | Quill Architects is thrilled that the House of Lebanon was recognized for its role in providing affordable housing to seniors and awarded first place in the renovation category.

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House of Lebanon Winning Board for the 2016 Affordable Housing Architectural Design Awards

 

House of Lebanon Featured in AIA DC’s ArchitectureDC Magazine

Cunningham | Quill Architect’s renovation and revitalization of the abandoned Margaret Murray Washington School, located in the historic Shaw neighborhood, into affordable housing for seniors, was featured in the 2016 Summer issue of ArchitectureDC. Author G. Martin Moeller, Jr., Assoc. AIA states that:

Although the building has been converted form academic to residential use, in many ways it has come full circle. “When we went back to do a photo shoot after the building opened,” said Scott Matties, AIA, LEED AP, Principal-in-Charge, “we met a couple of residents who had gone to school there or who had a brother or sister who did.” The House of Lebanon is thus not only a symbol of the city’s changing socioeconomic fortunes, but also a landmark to communal continuity.

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House of Lebanon Article in AIA DC’s ArchitectureDC Magazine