Lee Quill, FAIA and John Michael Day, AIA Present at DesignDC and Architecture Exchange East

 Lee Quill, FAIA Presents “Re-Greening the Living City: Ecological Corridors as Catalysts for Urban Revitalization” at DesignDC 2017: Rooted in Resilience

In the session, Re-Greening the Living City: Ecological Corridors as Catalysts for Urban Revitalization, Lee Quill, FAIA discussed Cunningham | Quill’s Strategic Investment Area (SIA) Plan for the City of Charlottesville, Virginia, which has been awarded four AIA awards. The plan illustrates a unique opportunity in urban resiliency to transform a forgotten former industrial area, featuring primarily low income and public housing, into a vibrant, new, mixed-income, mixed-use neighborhood, as well as urban greenway park. Building upon the existing site topography and hydrology conditions, the plan demonstrates how the creation of an ecological corridor can be a crucial organizing cultural and neighborhood connecting element and serve as a catalyst for urban revitalization.

The presentation addressed the following learning objectives:
1. Provide a general understanding of ecological corridors as catalysts for urban revitalization
2. Provide approaches and methodologies for successful community engagement in diverse communities (SIA Plan – process included 40 community and stakeholder meetings)
3. Provide specific examples of design components of ecological corridors
4. Provide examples of integrating social service programs with physical framework components of an urban design plan

 

John Michael Day, AIA and Mark Carroll, Executive Vice President at SKANSKA Present “Reimagining the Resilient Community Place of Worship: Sustainable Architectural and Development” at Architecture Exchange East 2017

John Michael Day, AIA, Associate Principal at Cunningham | Quill and Mark Carroll, Executive Vice President at SKANSKA USA Commercial Development brought both the architect and developer perspective in analyzing the successes of the 10th & G Offices and the First United Congregational United Church of Christ redevelopment project in the presentation Reimagining the Resilient Community Place of Worship: Sustainable Architectural and Development.

Across the country, places of worship have traditionally been keystones of their communities. These churches, synagogues, mosques and/or non-denominational places of worship from a wide network of social amenities that define many neighborhoods. However, currently, neighborhood places of worship are struggling to maintain their once prominent position in a shifting urban landscape. A shrinking congregation, property maintenance, and/or the growth and development of the surrounding community have whittled away at these organizations capacity to remain fiscally solvent. In addition to economic hurdles, many of these places of worship are struggling for relevancy in their community as societal habits embrace spirituality and move away from denominational faiths.

By affirming the mission values of the organization and utilizing creative development of their existing assets, neighborhood places of worship can survive and even thrive. Architects and developers play a seminal role in assisting these organizations in navigating a resilient solution to this contemporary dilemma. This discourse looked at the 10th & G Offices and the First United Congregational United Church of Christ redevelopment, following the development and design process that revitalized an existing church in the heart of the District of Columbia. The case study highlighted how the mission led to a resilient development solution that responded to the needs of the neighborhood while also allowing the church to remain in their neighborhood for years to come.